Skin Problems in Diabetes Part 2







There are many skin problems in diabetes. This page is a continuation of more common skin disorders in type 1 and 2 diabetics and images of what they appear like.



Acanthosis nigricans is a skin disorder that will show itself as a thickening and darkening of the skin in certain areas but especially in the skin folds. As you can see the skin will become tan or brown, is sometimes slightly raised and velvety. The condition often appears as a small wart. You'll see it in the back or sides of the neck, the armpits, or under the groin and breast areas. This skin problems happens to people that are overweight, and have insulin resistance syndromes. It usually will precede the onset of type 2 diabetes. Losing weight will help the problem.



Above is a picture of what diabetic bullae may look like on the foot. This skin problem is also known as bullosis diabticorum. There are blisters or lesions that can occur on the feet and hands of diabetic people. It is a more rare skin disorder, but a definite sign of diabetes. Diabetic bullae occur more in men than women. People that have had diabetes for many years, especially uncontrolled are more susceptible to this problem. There are two types of diabetic bullae:

Intraepidermal bullae Blisters appearing in this type of bullae are filled with a clear, steril viscous fluid. It will usually heal within 2 to 5 weeks without scarring and atrohpy.

Subepidermal bullae This is the less common type of bullae and can be filled with blood. Healed blisters may show scarring and atrophy.

Diabetic Bullae will usually heal without treatment from the doctor. Anyone that has it though, needs to make certain that the blister remains untouched as much as possible so as not to break it open. This will only worsen the problem and cause infections which can be serious.



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